Mike Pomper was putting the finishing touches on the upcoming edition of the State Line Tribune Tuesday evening — the second biggest paper of 2012, behind the Christmas edition.

The reason why is a mystery, unless you're familiar to Texico, N.M., or Farwell, Texas — the two towns the paper serves and the participants in the 46th year of Border Town Days.

Set to begin with a 7 a.m. (MDT) fun run and a 10 a.m. parade, the annual celebration draws anywhere between 1,500 and 3,000 people for what Pomper calls a simple celebration.

 

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Charlie May Trimble, then 6, rides her farm animal-themed bike Saturday in the 2011 Border Town Days Parade. Trimble won fourth place in the decorated bike contest, part of the annual celebration for the towns of Texico and Farwell, which are divided by the Texas-New Mexico border.

"Long story made short, it's a reason to get out and see your neighbors," said Pomper, who serves as chairman of the Border Town Days committee. "It's a community event to get out to the park for the day and say hi to each other."

 

The two main features of the day-long celebration include the parade ‚ which is preceded by a decorated bicycle contest with bicycle and cash prizes — and a celebration in the Farwell city park.

To Pomper's knowledge, the parade — which usually runs about 45 minutes — is the only parade in the country that starts in one state and ends in another.

There are nearly 40 giveaways from local merchants, numerous singers lined up for performances at the park, dozens of arts and crafts booths, a mechanical bull, and activities for children like bouncy houses and pony rides.

"Probably the thing we're most proud of is we have half a dozen people selling food," Pomper said. "But all the food that is sold is by local non-profits. If you buy a burger, you're helping out (Pleasant Hill 4-H). If you buy brisket, it goes to Rotary scholarships.

"The hardest part of spending money is knowing it's gone. At least here, you know where it's going."